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Citrix XenApp 75 inzetten binnen Microsoft Azure Cloud

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Deploying XenApp on a Microsoft Azure cloud 3 citrix.com White Paper 3 citrix.com 3 Deploying XenApp on a Microsoft Azure cloud conducted a series of performance tests in conjunction with input from Microsoft. The goal was to analyze the scalability and economics of XenApp on different Microsoft Azure instance types. Login VSI 4.0 software (from Login VSI Inc.) was used in the testing to generate user connections to XenApp and simulate user workloads running on Azure instances. Microsoft Azure instance types vary according to infrastructure resources and relative cost per hour, as shown in the table below. "Pay-as-you-go" pricing for Azure virtual machines varies by region and includes Windows licensing (see http://azure.microsoft.com/en-us/pricing/details/virtual-machines). Instance types Virtual cores RAM Disk sizes Price per hour 2 Small (A0) 1 768 MB 20.00 GB 0.02 Small (A1) 1 1.75 GB 70.00 GB 0.09 Medium (A2) 2 3.5 GB 135.00 GB 0.18 Large (A3) 4 7 GB 285.00 GB 0.36 Extra Large (A4) 8 14 GB 605.00 GB 0.72 Memory-Intensive A5 2 14 GB 135.00 GB 0.33 Memory-Intensive A6 4 28 GB 285.00 GB 0.66 Memory-Intensive A7 8 56 GB 605.00 GB 1.32 Topology for the scalability testing For the XenApp 7.5 testing, virtual machines were configured with Microsoft Windows Server 2012 R2 on Azure instances as follows: A virtual machine on an A2 instance containing: o 1x Login VSI controller and profile server o 4x Login VSI launchers A virtual machine on an A2 instance containing: o 1x Web Interface server o 1x Secure Gateway server A virtual machine on an A3 instance containing: o 1x dedicated XenApp 7.5 DC/XML broker o 1x Citrix license server o 1x Microsoft SQL server A virtual machine on an A1 instance containing: o 1x Active Directory controller and DNS server A virtual machine containing a single XenApp 7.5 worker server hosting simulated user sessions. This server was deployed on each instance type in different test runs to test the scalability of different Azure instances. Creating a virtual machine on Azure automatically creates an Azure Cloud Service container. By default virtual machines built in a Cloud Service are isolated on the same virtual network. Figure 1 depicts the test architecture. 2 Pay-as-you-go pricing as of September 24, 2014 for U.S. West. See http://azure.microsoft.com/en- us/pricing/details/virtual-machines/.

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